Last Updated 01.04.2010 (News entries: 62)

Mines and Minerals

02.1899

Volume: 19 [XIX]

Issue: 6

Page: 327

[Mining Notes]:

Isabella Mine

   A new vein and ore chute was opened up in the Isabella (Cripple Creek) south and up the hill from the old Buena Vista fissure.
   This ore chute has been drifted on a distance of over 400 feet at the second level, and the ore body has been found in crosscuts at the fifth and ninth levels.
   The pay-streak is from eighteen inches to two feet wide.

Morning Times

31.12.1899

Volume:

Issue: 0

Page: 5

[Article]:

- Cripple Creek Ore Output 1899

CRIPPLE CREEK CHALLENGES THE WORLD

Our Output of Gold is Greater Than That of Any State in the Union.

OUR PRODUCTION IS $21,000,000

We Extend to the Nations Wishes for a Prosperous and Happy New Year.

IN 1900 WE WILL MINE $30,000,000, PERHAPS MORE

We Shake Hands With Colorado and Promise That She Shall Lead the World in Production of Gold.

------


   Twenty millions, seven hundred and sixty-one thousand, eight hundred and forty two dollars, is the value of the gold output of the Cripple Creek district for the year 1899.
   In round numbers, it is $21,000,000.

   The production for the last month of 1899 was $3,000,000.
By months for the year, the output of the district is as follows:
January

$ 1,522,500

February

1,296,750

March

1,504,000

April

1,513,000

May

1,625,212

June

1,091,000

July

1,181,980

August

1,445,300

September

1,731,000

October

2,003,600

November

2,847,500

December

3,000,000

Total

$ 20,761,842


   The output for the Cripple Creek district for the month of December is $3,000,000 in round numbers, including the estmated output of the Economic mill, for which no clean-up has been made.
   The Economic has been in operation a month and a great quantity of ore has been handled in an experimental way, which General Manager Woods estimates to be worth $100,000.
The output from the various reduction mills and smelters is as follows:


Tonnage

Per ton

Value

Arequa

2,000

$ 23

$ 46,000

Colorado City

8,200

35

287,000

Metallic, Florence

8,250

20

165,000

El Paso

3,500

35

122,500

National

1,650

35

57,750

Miscellaneous



50,000

Smelting ore

28,000

80

2,240,000

Total



$2,968,250

   In the smelting ore is included the recent Isabella shipment, which is of the highest grade and raises the average of the value per ton.
   The tonnage from the district is less than it was last month.

   The work of the year may be shown in the figures of the Woods Investment company.
the ore shipped from the properties owned by the Woods people is as follows:

Tonnage

Value

Gold Coin

26,800

$ 1,250,000

Wild Horse

8,746

425,600

Deadwood

4,000

135,000

Jack Pot

18,640

850,000

Battle Mountain and other properties


125,000

Total


$ 2,785,600

   These are the highest figures of any combination of mines.
   The Independence output for the year is $2,000,000.
   The Portland is $2,2500,000
   So it can be observed that the Woods Investment company has jumped to the top, and had it not been for the Victor fire and the consequent shutting down of the Gold Coin the output from this group alone would have been $3,000,000 for the year.
   This rounds out a production of $74,000,000 in nine years.

Eagle County Times

07.04.1900

Volume: 14 [XIV]

Issue: 28

Page: 3

[Article]:

- Cripple Creek Production

CRIPPLE CREEK'S PRODUCT

For the Month of March It Was Over two Millions.


   The production of the Cripple creek district for the month of March was 51,818 tons, of a gross bullion value of $2,218,628.
   This is a slight increase over February, but does not reach the January record.
   Compared with February, the average daily production shows a big increase in mill-grade and a falling off in smelting grade product.
   The total shows a decided increase in tonnage.

   The increase in the mill-grade production is very gratifying. It is due to the increased capacity of the reduction plants treating Cripple Creek ores.
   The Brodie, Gillett and Economic mills were each important factors during the month.
Satisfactory reports are to hand regarding the Economic mill, which it is officially stated is a complete success.
   Its production would be much higher if it were possible to get a larger supply of water.
The big Florence mill and Colorado plant both show an increase for the month.
   Work on the new plants and the additions to the older ones is progressing and there is yet an ample supply of ore for all the enterprises contemplated.

   The smelting-grade estimate is placed lower this month.
   The Isabella, Jack Pot and Pinnacle were not factors in swelling the production figures during March.
   This is no reflection whatever on the mines. ut is due to different causes and the ore is still in the ground.

The Cripple Creek Times

01.01.1903

Volume:

Issue: 0

Page: 17-18

[Article]:

- Future of the District 1903

FUTURE OF THE CRIPPLE CREEK DISTRICT

A conservative and intelligent paper, showing that its life will be long and prosperous, by Chas. J. Moore, the well-known Mining Engineer.


   Every mining district in the western portion of the United States has its alternation of "boom" and quietude, activity and dullness, until the permanent average production is reached, and the problems of supply and demand finally settled on business lines.
   In Cripple Creek district a feature of fluctuation entirely outside of the question of the ore production, labor, transportation, treatment facilities and charges has had more influence than anything else on the general prosperity of the district - the mining stock market.
   This influence has at times been quite detrimental to the interests of the district. It is difficult to make the ordinary investor understand that the actual condition of the raining industry is not directly reflected in the stock market.
   In fact the two are as completely separated as the Chicago grain market and the actual production of cereals.

   The great depression of the stock market here for the past two years has caused a false impression through the country that there is a constant and serious decrease in the amount and valuation of the ore production.
   The stock market is merely a field for speculation, and the quotations on any stock is in no degree based upon the indications at the mine upon which the company is nominally organized.
   This is certainly wrong, but it, appears as though no reform will ever occur unless all promoters and brokers were held by law to strict accountability for all statements made in reference to the properties whose stock they may be offering, or the enterprises promoted.
   In looking at the future, there are several questions to be considered.

1. Are the mines permanent, and for how long wil they continue to produce payable ore?

2. Will the present ore-producing territory be enlarged, and if so, in what direction?

3. Will the treatment facilities continue in the present state, improve or deteriorate?

4. Will the transportation facilities continue,  improve or lessen?


   It would seem that the consideration of the first two questions includes an answer to the last two; if, for instance, the district will enlarge, the transportation and treatment facilities will be enlarged at an equal rate, and charges for both decrease as the supply becomes larger.
   From the numerous developments that have been made in the territory outside a circle, say, six miles in diameter, having the summit of Iron Clad hill for its center, it would appear that no further extension of the ore-bearing district can be expected beyond the limits we now have.
   This does not mean that all the mines are already opened, for very large tracts of territory within this circle remain undeveloped, in some of which certainly new mines will be opened up. We have certainly not reached the end of new discoveries within the district.

   A large impetus in this direction will be given by opening the properties of the Stratton Mining and Development company to lessees, which is now expected very shortly.
   The main question remaining is that of the permanency of the mines, and of this, during the past year, we have received very promising evidence.

   The deepest mines now being worked on the different hills are as follows:

BATTLE MOUNTAIN.

Feet.

Portland, Burns shaft
1,100
Portland, shaft No. 2
1,260
Granite
1,000
Ajax
1,000
Stratton's Independence
1,460
Strong
900
Gold  Coin
1,100
Modoc
800

BULL HILL.

Feet.

Last Dollar
1,218
Blue Bird
1,371
Logan
1,400
American Eagles
1,500
Wild Horse
1,050
Isabella
900

EAST SPUR BULL HILL.

Feet.

Independence T. & M. Co
1,160
Vindicator
1,200
Lillie
1,510
Golden Cycle
900

   All but one of these shafts have good bodies of ore and excellent indications for the future at the lowest levels to which they have thus far attained.
   Certain of these shafts, to wit, the Last Dollar and Blue Bird, show some of the richest ore ever mined in the district at their lowest levels.
   It has lately been asserted that this great enrichment of these veins is due to secondary deposit. By this is meant that the gold values have been largely leached from the upper portion of these veins and redeposited at a lower level, thereby enriching the original ore deposit of the vein by this amount.
   It is still an open question whether this enrichment extends to every ore-bearing vein in the district, but it would certainly appear probable that those veins which have shown lean or poor zones of ground in their upper portion carry enriched ore bodies at greater depths; this would be especially true of those veins which at the surface and for some distance below yielded good ore followed by poorer ground in greater depth.

   A special feature of these rich ore bodies at 1,200 and 1,300 feet below surface is the presence of copper, which is entirely absent from the upper or oxidized portion of the Cripple Creek vein.
   Another change in the mineral contents of the veins at the greatest depth thus far attained is the presence of lead, zinc and antimony in sulphide form and increase in the iron sulphide generally called "pyrites."
   None of these changes coming in the veins at depth indicate any decrease of gold or silver values, but on the contrary, in the immediate future, a great increase from a plane about 9,100 feet above sea level downwards.
   The thickness or depth of this rich zone is purely a matter of conjecture, but probably not less than 300 feet. Underneath this may be expected poorer ground, but still carrying payable ore.
   Deeper than this, neither practical experience nor theories can guide us as to what to expect in the future, nor can the life of the district be reasonably predicted, though it would appear to be safe to reckon on the present average production for at least seven years to come.

   The most menacing question which has arisen during the past year is that of the water, which must be pumped in order to work the veins deeper.
   The investigations made during the past year have clearly proved that the underground water is not in the nature of streams fed from perpetual springs, but rather an accumulation from many cycles of past rain and snowfalls upon the ground surface which has penetrated to some distance below the surface and there formed a reservoir contained within the granite walls of the Cripple Creek volcano.
   Now as pumping is continued in such a reservoir, it follows that the permanent level is being continually lowered and that as the sides of the crater flatten and slope towards its center the total area to be pumped will be less as greater depth is attained.
   To shorten the time and expense required for such pumping, various tunnel projects have been proposed during the past year, and the plans for one are now definitely settled, which will be started shortly after the beginning of the year 1903 by the cooperation of half a dozen mining companies most vitally interested.

   By the driving of a tunnel 10,000 feet it is estimated that the reservoir will be tapped and the water drained in a short time to a depth of 250 feet below the present level, or to a level of 8,775 feet above the sea.
   This will at once enable the El Paso, Mary McKinney, Work, Anaconda, Elkton, Moon-Anchor, Midget and probably many other mines to sink 250 feet deeper than their present workings.
   Doubtless long before this tunnel will have accomplished all that is expected of it, another one at greater depth on a more comprehensive scale will be well under way by the cooperation of a much larger number of mine owners, possibly those of the entire district.

   In view of all the statements of fact above, it will be seen that successful future of the district is certain, and that the average grade of the ore produced during the next two years will in all probability be higher than at any time during the past, except the years 1894 to 1897.

CHAS. J. MOORE,

Mining Engineer.

Cripple Creek, Colo., Dec. 12, 1902.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

10.01.1903

Volume: 75 [LXXV]

Issue: 2

Page: 97

[General Mining News]:

Isabella Gold Mining Company

   The annual meeting of the stockholders has been called for January 20 at Colorado Springs. Some time ago it was rumored that an effort would be made to consolidate the property with that of the Empire State Mines Company, but little has been heard of the matter lately.
   From all accounts, the company has done very well under the present management, who assumed control about a year ago.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

21.02.1903

Volume:

Issue: 0

Page: 310

[General Mining News]:

Isabella Gold Mining Company

   A report is again in circulation that this company and the Empire State Company are to be consolidated. The report has been heard before, and it is understood that the reason that negotiations failed was because a division of the stock could not be arranged.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

07.03.1903

Volume:

Issue: 0

Page: 385

[General Mining News]:

Empire State Mines Company

   Numerous rumors are heard of litigation between this company and the Isabella, that the company is to sue the Isabella and others, that the Isabella is to sue the Empire or the Orphan Belle, the company that owned the EmĀ­pire property at the time the ore was alleged to have been taken.
   As to the truth of these rumors no satisfactory information can be had.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

28.03.1903

Volume:

Issue: 0

Page: 493-494

[Special Correspondence]:

- Colorado Springs Mills & The District

   While the militia has been withdrawn from Colorado City and the preservation of the peace is in the hands of the sheriff, open questions between capital and labor still exist, which threaten depreciation in industrial resources, with resulting suffering and losses by commercial and industrial interests.

   Governor Peabody has appointed an advisory board to investigate the matters remaining open, and to make a full and detailed report to him. This board, whose ability is not doubted, consists of Prof. William F. Slocum, president of Colorado College, Colorado Springs; Charles D. Hayt, Denver, former Justice of the State Supreme Court; Rev. Thomas A. Uzzell, member of the Board of Supervisors of the Denver City Council; Frank W. Frewen, Cripple Creek, member of the present Colorado Legislature and a labor leader; Father Joseph P. Carrigan, a leading priest of Denver.

   There is no provision in the statutes of Colorado for compulsory arbitration, and the above board was merely apointed to get at the bottom of the difficulty. The board will hold public sessions for taking testimony in the Chamber of Commerce Building, Denver, and will probably visit Colorado City and Cripple Creek and possibly Idaho Springs.

   Present conditions at Cripple Creek cannot long continue. The chlorination mills at Colorado City and Florence of the United States Reduction and Refining Company, declared unfair by the unions, were the principal market for Cripple Creek ores running under 1,5 or 2 oz. gold per ton. The smelters of the American Smelting and Refining Company at Denver and Pueblo, and the Boston & Colorado Smelting Company, at Denver, handle higher grades. Some of the mines may have ore high enough to ship to the Denver and Pueblo smelters, but most have not, and these low-grade mines can only ship to the chlorination mills of the United States Reduction and Refining Company. Other local mills have more ore on hand than they can treat, and cannot accept ore from new customers.
   At Colorado City, the Portland Mill handles only the output of the Portland Mine, and the Telluride Mill, closed for alterations and additions, will not be able to receive ore for some time. If a settlement between the unions and the United States Reduction and Refining Company is not soon effected, the mine owners dependent on the mills of that company must soon close down. The United States Company's mills are said to have about two weeks' supply of ore on hand.

   The Granite Mine, owned by the United States Reduction and Refining Company, is closed. Stratton's Independence, under contract to ship to the same company, is also closed, as is the Isabella, which also was under contract. Altogether 600 or 700 men are already out of employment by order of the unions.
   Several mines, such as the Ajax. Elkton, Strong, Gold King, etc., which usually ship to the United States Reduction and Refining Company, are working, but are said to store their ore.

(BY   TELEGRAPH.)

   The strike situation at Cripple Creek continues unchanged. The Governor's advisory commission, which has been taking testimony at Denver, is at Colorado Springs, and leaves for Colorado City March 26. The Elkton Mine attempted to ship ore from the Standard Mill March 24. and the miners struck.
   The Gold King is also closed, and altogether about 1,000 men are out at Cripple Creek. The mines now closed are the Independence, Elkton. Granite, Thompson. Isabella, Golden Cycle, Gold King and Strong. At Colorado City everything is quiet. There are reports, not verified, that a settlement of the strike is in sight.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

28.03.1903

Volume:

Issue: 0

Page: 497

[General Mining News]:

- Strike Shut Downs

   Besides the Stratton's Independence the Isabella Gold Mining Company, the Granite Gold Mining Company, the Tompson and the Elkton Dump lease have shut down.
   The Ajax Gold Mining Company has quit breaking ore, and is only doing development, as is the Strong Gold Mining Company and the Gold King Mining Company.
   What ore is mined is stored and not shipped, owing to the labor troubles. There are about 718 men now idle in the district.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

28.03.1903

Volume:

Issue: 0

Page: 497

[General Mining News]:

Isabella Gold Mining Company

   Babbit and Murphy, leasing on the Buena Vista claim, have installed a hoisting plant on the incline of the Buena Vista, and will use a skip. They have obtained an extension of their lease.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

04.04.1903

Volume:

Issue: 0

Page: 537

[General Mining News]:

- Strike Situation at Cripple Creek

   The situation is somewhat improved, but not yet settled. A number of concessions have been made by both sides.
   The Standard Mill in Colorado City is running in part, operated by non-union men, the union men being out.
   At present the mines shut down are the Stratton's Independence, Golden Cycle, Elkton, Isabella, Gold King, Granite and Thompson. About 1,000 men are out.
   At present it seems as though the strike at the mill would be settled, as all the demands of the union men at the mill have been met with, except as to the reinstatement of some of the striking mill men.
   If the trouble is not settled very soon a number of mines will have to close from having no marked for their ore.
   The Vindicator will close April 1, unless settlement is made. The Hull City Placer of the Independence Consolidated is also expected to close soon.
   Should the strike trouble blow over the outlook for the district is quite good for the coming summer.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

18.04.1903

Volume:

Issue: 0

Page: 610

[General Mining News]:

Isabella Gold Mining Company

   This property has not started since being closed by the strike, and what will be done is not known. A number of rumors are heard.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

06.07.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 1

Page: 38

[Mining Stocks]:

- Mining Stocks

   Colorado Springs, June 30 - Cripple Creek mining stocks have been rather inactive and the tendency has been to lower prices. There is no particular cause for the decline, and it appears to be simply a temporary lull in trading.

   El Paso was the feature of the week, on today's market selling from $1.55 to $1.40 on heavy selling orders. While there are some rumors, it is not known that mine conditions are any different than they have been for some time, and it is suggested that a large block of stock held for collateral has been forced on the market.
   Elkton has been selling close to 42c. all the week.
   Findley has shaded off about 2c., selling today for 75c.
   Isabella has also declined about the same amount, selling for 28c.
   Portland sold for $2.35.
   The report of Stratton's Independence mine shows a profit of about $450,000, which the company has realized from the mine under the leasing system from July, 1904, up to May of this year.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

15.07.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 2

Page: 86

[General Mining News]:

Isabella Gold Mining Company

   Sinking is in progress on the old Empire State shaft of this property on company account. It is intended to deepen the shaft considerably from its present depth, which is about 800 ft.
   On the old Isabella workings ore is being taken out by lessees Murphy, Hamlin and associates.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

29.07.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 4

Page: 190-191

[Mining Stocks]:

- Mining Stocks

   Colorado Springs, July 21 - The market in Cripple Creek shares shows little changes in prices or volume of trading. It is reported today that one of the richest strikes ever reported in the district was made on the Hull City mine.

  • El Paso has remained practically at the same price, selling today for $1.25
  • Portland is selling at $2.25.
  • The last sale of Findley was at 61.5c.
  • Isabella remains close to 28c.
  • Gold Sovereign sold today for 9.5c.
  • Independence at 10c.
  • United Gold Mines at 15.5c. per share.

   At the meeting of the directors of the Colorado Springs Mining Exchange, F. F. Castello was elected president; J. A. Hayes, first vice-president; J. R. McKinnie, second vice-president; J. Arthur Connell, third vice-president; W. P. Kinney, secretary and treasurer.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

05.08.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 5

Page: 228

[General Mining News]:

Isabella Mines Company

   The Empire State shaft of this company is producing some ore. This part of the property is being worked by the company, under the management of George Kilborn.
   The old Isabella workings, which are being operated under lease by Murphy & Co., are also shipping some ore.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

12.08.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 6

Page: 273

[Special Correspondence]:

- Cripple Creek Up To Date

   Cripple Creek, Aug. 5 - The Cripple Creek district is making a very creditable showing at present in a mining way. A number of the mines, however, are reducing their forces a little, some only temporarily and some otherwise.
   A very strong effort is being made to get rid of the ore thieves, or "high-graders," in the district.

   Quite a number of the mines are being worked on the leasing or tribute system. Among these are Stratton's Independence, the Ajax, Gold Coin, Last Dollar, Hull City Placer and others.
   In these mines the leases are let in blocks in the mine, and the hoisting is done by the company and charged to the lessees. A number of other properties are also being worked by lessees, many of whom are operating their own plants and have workings separate from each other.
   Quite a large part of the holdings of the Stratton estate have been leased and considerable work is being done on this property. Lately some of the leases have closed down, some for temporary reasons and some because they did not pay.

   Beacon hill is at present quite lively, especially on the western side. On this side are working El Paso, the C. K. & N., Old Gold, Henry Adney, Lonaconing, Maid of Orleans, Mary Nevin and others.
   The expectation that the new drainage tunnel will soon be commenced, as well as a number of new strikes in this vicinity, has given quite an impetus to work.
   No great amount of new machinery is being put in, although several compressors are being installed.

   The Homestake mill, which is the largest cyanide plant in the district, is closed down, presumably on account of the low values of the ore.
   Several smaller mills are running.

   The Portland mine keeps up its usual steady production, as well as the Vindicator and other large mines. The old Isabella is being worked under lease and is shipping some ore.
   The Empire State property of the Isabella Mines Co. is being worked on company account.
   The W. P. H., on Ironclad hill, is being worked by the owners, while a number of other properties in the vicinity are being operated by lessees.

   As far as can be seen at present, the merging of the railroad interests in the district has not hurt mining operation in any material way.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

19.08.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 7

Page: 335

[Mining Stocks]:

- Mining Stocks

   Colorado Springs, Aug. 12 - The market for Cripple Creek shares on the local exchange seems to be taking a summer vacation and prices and the volume of trading remains stationary.
   El Paso is the only stock varying from prices of one week ago; this stock is inclined to shade off a little. Nothing of importance has developed in regard to it since last week.
   The suit threatened against the taking over of the Beacon Hill-Ajax claim will probably be compromised. This stock sold on today's market for $1.27.
  • Portland is selling for $2.30
  • Findley is traded in lightly at 71c.
  • Isabella remains dull around 20c.
  • Gold Sovereign is selling for 10.5c.
  • Elkton is 42c. bid with 44c. asked.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

19.08.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 7

Page: 325

[General Mining News]:

Isabella Mines Company

   Sinking is in progress on the Empire State shaft of this property. The shaft was 800 ft. deep when the present sinking commenced, and it is to be sunk to the depth of 1,300 ft.
   A new hoist has been put in, and work is progressing favorably.

   Other parts of the Empire State property are under lease to C. N. Crowder and associates. Murphy and associates on the main Isabella workings are making some money.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

26.08.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 8

Page: 383

[Mining Stocks]:

- Mining Stocks

   Colorado Springs, Aug. 18 - There has been a little activity in the trading in Cripple Creek shares during the past week, and the brokers feel confident that it is the beginning of a good fall market, although thus far prices have not materially changed.
  • Anaconda is now selling at 14c.
  • Elkton remains close to 42c.
  • El Paso sold during the week as high as $1.275, but closed today at $1.225
  • Findley remains in the neighborhood of 71.5c.
  • Isabella sold down to 28.75c. on today's market.
  • Portland sold during the week for $2.28 @ $2.40
  • and Vindicator sold up to 87.75c. per share.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

02.09.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 9

Page: 430-431

[Mining Stocks]:

- Mining Stocks

   Colorado Springs, Aug. 25 - The mining market has been unusually active during the past week and Cripple Creek stocks have been in good demand.
   Prices have made an advance in quite a number of instances, but this has not brought out a very large amount of stock.
   Elkton stockholders are receiving their dividend of 0.5c. per share.
  • El Paso has been quite an active trader, although this stock has registered a slight decline, selling today for $1.24.
  • Elkton has advanced, and sold today for 44.5c.
  • Findley has also made a similar advance and was traded in today at 74c.
  • Gold Sovereign has increased about 2c. and sold today for 13.375c.
  • Isabella remains close to 29.5c.
  • Vindicator sold during the week for 85c.
  • Cripple Creek Consolidated sold up to 8c.
  • United Gold Mines at 16c.
   There were no sales of Portland.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

09.09.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 10

Page: 479

[Mining Stocks]:

- Mining Stocks

   Colorado Springs, Sept. 1 - The market in Cripple Creek shares during the past week has been quite active, although prices have not varied much during that time.
   The amount of trading for August was double that of August last year.

   August also led the other months of the year in output, exceeding July by over $100,000. The total output of the Cripple Creek district for August was $1,928,075.
  • Portland sold during the week for $2.35
  • El Paso, which has been selling around $1.20, dropped off to $1.165 on today's market.
  • Elkton remains around 46c.
  • Findley has advanced from 74c. to 77c.
  • Isabella sold on today's market for 30c.
  • Golden Cycle sold during the week for 60c.
  • and Vindicator at 85c.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

16.09.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 11

Page: 526

[Mining Stocks]:

- Mining Stocks

   Colorado Springs, Sept. 8 - The market for the past week has shown no interesting features with the exception of El Paso, which has taken a sensational decline, selling as low as 85c., but recovering to 94c. on today's market.
   Most all Cripple Creek stocks in the mines list fell off a fraction during the week.
  • Elkton has shaded from 46.5c. to 44c.
  • Findley from 77c. to 75c.
  • Isabella from 30c. to 29c.
  • Gold Sovereign from 12c. to 10.75c.
  • Work from 10.25c. to 9.5c.
  • Acacia made a fractional gain, selling today for 10.75c.
  • Portland sold on today's market for $2.25 and $2.225.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

23.09.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 12

Page: 575

[Mining Stocks]:

- Mining Stocks

   Colorado Springs, Sept. 15 - The only feature of the past week's stock market has been the fluctuations in El Paso.
   There seems to be no known reason for the sudden drop this stock has recently made, and no statement is published.
  • It recovered considerably from last week's decline, but commenced to slide again, and today sold down to 76c.
  • Portland continues to be traded in occasionally at $2.25.
  • Findley sold today for 76c.
  • There has been but little trading in Elkton, but the price remains close to 44c.
  • Isabella stock remains practically stationary, selling today for 28.5c.
  • Vindicator sold during the week for 80c. per share.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

30.09.1905

Volume: 80 [LXXX]

Issue: 13

Page: 622-623

[Mining Stocks]:

- Mining Stocks

   Colorado Springs, Sept. 22 - The Cripple Creek stocks have been in somewhat better demand during the past week, and prices have advanced in a number of instances, but no sensational changes have been noticed.
  • Elkton made the most marked gain, increasing from 44 to 56.5c. This mine has increased its force of miners and there is a rumor that a good strike has been made.
  • El Paso again reached the low mark of 76c. during the week, but closed today at 81c.
  • Findley has made a slight gain, selling today for 79c.
  • Portland remains at the same old price of $2.25.
  • Isabella is selling at 28.5c.
  • Gold Sovereign has shaded off a fraction, selling today for 11.125c.
  • Gold Coin sold during the week for 15c.
  • and United Gold Mines at the same figure.
  • Golden Cycle is quoted at 60 @ 70c.
  • Independence at 12.5 @ 15c.
  • Acacia made an advance from 12.375 to 14.75c., but dropped off to 12.25c. today.
   Preliminary work on the great drainage tunnel has been started, and it is estimated it will take two years to complete.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

27.11.1909

Volume: 88 (LXXXVIII]

Issue: 22

Page: 1089

[General Mining News]:

Big Lease Given By Isabella Gold Mining Company

   The biggest lease ever granted on a producing mine in the Cripple Creek district was recently executed when the Isabella Gold Mining Company turned over to T. B. Burbridge, of Denver, and the Western Investment Company 65 acres of Isabella ground on Bull hill for two years, on a graded royalty.
   The lease covers the following properties: Empire State, Emmas 1 and 2, Comet, Tom Thumb, Sully, Snow Bird and Jack Rabbits Nos. 1 to 5.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

25.12.1909

Volume: 88 (LXXXVIII]

Issue: 26

Page: 1292

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   The day lease on Orphan Bell is shipping a 25-ton car every second day. A large tonnage of milling ore is developed in this mine and as so often happens, was found behind what was the supposed wall of the old Maloney vein, which produced great riches in the early days.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

16.07.1910

Volume: 90 [XC]

Issue: 3

Page: 137

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   In June this company shipped 39 cars of ore of an average value of $20 per ton.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

03.09.1910

Volume: 90 [XC]

Issue: 10

Page: 476

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   The semi-annual report shows total receipts for the period of $122,991, of which $90,593 was from ore shipped by lessees, $5757 from ore mined on company account, and $11,009 from ores treated at the company's mill.
   Lessees received $47,779, while transportation and treatment charged totaled $75,411. The cash balance on hand is $8768, with several cars of ore unsettled for.
   The report gives the number of leased blocks at above 30, and the majority producing.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

17.09.1910

Volume: 90 [XC]

Issue: 12

Page: 575

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   The August production of this property was 1232 tons, of an average of about $25 per ton. It was produced entirely by lessees.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

12.11.1910

Volume: 90 [XC]

Issue: 20

Page: 981

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   Dewar & Nicholson, lessees on the Orphan claim on Bull hill, have opened a vein of shipping ore in an abandoned shaft.
   Fifteen cars, average $35 per ton have been shipped from the Empire State shaft since September.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

19.11.1910

Volume: 90 [XC]

Issue: 21

Page: 1029

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   From the Empire shaft of this company 14 cars were shipped, of ounce of gold ore, and four cars of mill ore from the Ophir.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

03.12.1910

Volume: 90 [XC]

Issue: 23

Page: 1125

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   The leasers on this company's properties will this month have produced approximately 1500 tons of ore, estimated at a value of 1 oz. gold per ton.
   A Seattle company has taken a three-years' lease on the mill and tailings dump.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

17.12.1910

Volume: 90 [XC]

Issue: 25

Page: 1225

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   The output of this mine and the Empire State, of the same company, was 65 cars in November.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

01.07.1911

Volume: 92

Issue: 1

Page: 37

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   After spending two months in repairing the Isabella mill, the Western Reduction Company has the plant in operation. Mr. Hess, local manager, says that the capacity is 27.000 tons per month; that 10,000 tons will be treated at first, but which will soon be increased to 20,000 tons per month.
  He expects to make $1.20 to $1.40 per ton net.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

02.12.1911

Volume: 92

Issue: 23

Page: 1104

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   A rich strike is reported in this company's property on Bull hill, the streak being 3 in. wide and seamed with native gold.
   There are 30 sets of lessees in the properties of the company, most of whom are shipping ore.

The Engineering & Mining Journal

07.09.1912

Volume: 94

Issue: 10

Page: 470

[General Mining News]:

Isabella

   Another strike has been made in the Fackerell lease on the north 900-ft. level of the Lee shaft.

Mining and Scientific Press

12.07.1913

Volume: 107

Issue: 2

Page: 72

[General Mining News]:

- Cripple Creek Production

   According to local statistics, the gold production of Cripple Creek was as follows:


Name

Tons

Av. val.

Gross value.

Golden Cycle, Colorado City

34,000

$ 20.00

$ 680,000

Portland, Colorado City

9,950

22.00

218,900

Smelters, Pueblo and Denver

3,850

65.00

250,250

Portland. Cripple Creek

13,600

3.00

30,800

Stratton's Independence

11,800

2.36

27,848

Colburn Ajax

4,245

2.59

11,674

Gaylord Dante

1,800

3.00

5,400

Kavanaugh-Jo Dandy

1,500

2.30

3,450

Wild Horse

1,300

3.20

4,160

Isabella

625

2.00

1,250





Total

82,670


$1,233,732


   El Paso company and lessees shipped 100 and 48 cars of ore, respectively.
   The Cresson mine, on Raven hill, produced about 4000 tons. Eight sacks of ore, valued at $1000, were stolen from a freight car between Cripple Creek and Colorado Springs.
   Lessees at the Deadwood, Sitting Bull, Rising Sun, Vindicator, and W. P. H. properties are doing fairly well. An experimental cyanide plant is being erected at the Vindicator to treat dump ore.

   The flow of water from the Roosevelt tunnel is now 6735 gal. per minute. The recession during June was about 72 in., and waterlevel is 30 ft. below No. 11 level of the Gold Coin shaft.

Mining and Scientific Press

09.08.1913

Volume: 107

Issue: 6

Page: 241

[General Mining News]:

- Cripple Creek Ore Output July

   According to local statistics, the July output of the district was as follows:

Plant

Tons

Av. val.

Gross value.

Golden Cycle

32,000

$ 20.00

$ 640,000

Portland (Colorado City)

9,665

22.00

212,630

Smelters

3,825

65.00

248.625

Portland (Cripple Creek)

13,600

2.60

35,360

Stratton's Independence

11,073

2.23

24,693

Colburn-Ajax

4,400

2.84

12,496

Kavanagh-Jo Dandy

1,700

2.20

3.740

Gaylord-Dante

1,600

2.50

4,000

Rex M. & M. Co

1,200

1.10

1,320

Wild Horse

1,100

2.20

2,420

Isabella

700

2.00

1,400





Total

80,863


$1,186,684

Mining and Scientific Press

16.08.1913

Volume: 107

Issue: 7

Page: 280

[General Mining News]:

Isabella Mine

   During July 58 cars, equal to 1500 tons, of ore was shipped from the Isabella mine. E. J. Packerell, a lessee, is at present developing a new ore-shoot, opened by him on No. 4 vein.
   The drift driven north and south has already proved the shoot for the distance of 30 ft., and the ore broken fully 3,5 ft. wide, as exposed in both headings, is worth from $40 to $80 per ton.

Mining and Scientific Press

30.08.1913

Volume: 107

Issue: 9

Page: 357

[General Mining News]:

- Cripple Creek Production

   During July, eight of the local mills, the Portland, Stratton's Independence, Colburn-AJax, Kavanagh-Jo Dandy, Gaylord-Dante, Rex Mining & Milling Co., Wild Horse, and Isabella plants, treated 35,373 tons of ore with a gross value of $85,428.
   This low-grade ore ranged in value from $1.10 to $2.84 per ton, with a general average value of $2.41 per ton.
   This tonnage will be increased soon by the addition to the Portland mill and the completion of the Neville and El Oro mills.
   The Gaylord mill is treating about 75 tons per day, and a clean-up on August 20 resulted in bullion worth $4000.

Mining and Scientific Press

06.09.1913

Volume: 107

Issue: 10

Page: 392

[General Mining News]:

- Cripple Creek Production

   According to local statistics, the Cripple Creek district in August produced 85,381 tons of ore with a gross value of $1,251,809, as follows:

Plants

Ore treated tons

Av. val. per ton

Gross val.

Golden Cycle

33,500

$ 20.00

$ 670,000

Portland (Colorado City)

10,000

22.00

220,000

Smelters

4,000

65.00

260,000

Portland (Cripple Creek)

15,800

2.50

39,500

Stratton's Independence

11,286

2.67

30,133

Colburn-Ajax

5,580

3.20

17,856

Gaylord-Dante

1,400

3.00

4,200

Kavanagh-Jo Dandy

1,600

2.10

3,360

Wild Horse

1,165

4.00

4,660

Isabella

750

2.00

1,B00

*Rex M. & M. Co

300

2.00

600





Total

85,381


$1,251,809

*Dump ore experiments.

Mining and Scientific Press

11.10.1913

Volume: 107

Issue: 15

Page: 589-590

[General Mining News]:

- Cripple Creek Production

   The reported production of the district during September was as follows:

Plants

Tonnage

Av. val.

Gross val.

Golden Cycle, Colorado City

33,000

$ 20.00

$ 660,000

Portland, Colorado City

10,500

22.00

231,000

Mills and smelters, Pueblo and Denver

3,865

65.00

251,225

Portland, Cripple Creek district

14,600

2.96

43,216

Stratton's Independence

11,375

2.67

30,271

Colburn-Ajax

5,285

3.25

18,931

Gaylord-Dante

1,200

3.50

4,200

Kavanaugh-Jo Dandy

1,500

2.10

3,150

Rex M. & M. Co

700

1.40

980

Wild Horse

900

4.40

3,960

Isabella

925

3.20

2,960





Total

84,390


$1,249,893


   Details of September ore production from the various groups are approximately as follows:
  • Gold Sovereign on Bull hill, 350 to 400 tons of $10 to $30 ore
  • Ajax property, on Battle mountain, 6811 tons, worth $38,060
  • El Paso, on Beacon hill, 2600 tons
  • C. K. & N., on Beacon hill, 400 tons of $20 ore
  • Granite property, on Battle mountain, 2250 tons
  • Cresson Consolidated, 5000 tons
  • lessees at the United Gold property, 750 tons
  • and Vindicator, on Bull hill, 3250 tons, including lessees.

Mining and Scientific Press

11.10.1913

Volume: 107

Issue: 15

Page: 590

[General Mining News]:

Isabella Mines Company

   The report of the Isabella Mines Co. shows that during the past year, exclusive of lessees' work, development covered 3438 ft.
   Ore sales realized $181,692; payments to lessees, freight, and transport, $159,403; net receipts, from ore sales, $22,288.
   With other revenue the total was $26,772. Company expenditure, including mine development, was $18,490, leaving a profit of $8490.

Mining and Scientific Press

08.11.1913

Volume: 107

Issue: 19

Page: 734

[Article]:

Depth of Shafts at Cripple Creek

   The following list has been compiled by the Cripple Creek Times-Record, and will serve as an index of the present scope of operations at Cripple Creek.

Battle Mountain:
  • Ajax Gold Mining Co.'s main shaft, 1228 ft. deep.
  • Granite Gold Mining Co.'s Gold Coin shaft, 1225 ft. - two levels are now submerged by seepage water.
  • Portland Gold Mining Co.'s No. 1 shaft, 1250 ft., in course of sinking to depth of 1600 ft.
  • - and No. 2 shaft, 1600 ft.
  • - and No. 3 shaft, 1200 ft., has been abandoned.
  • Stratton's Independence, Ltd., main shaft, 1430 ft.
  • Strong Gold Mining Co., 1200 feet.

Bull Hill, Bull Hill not only has the deepest shaft in the district, but also the greatest number of shafts sunk below the 1200-ft. point:
  • Acacia G. M. Co., South Burns shaft, 1200 ft.
  • Blue Bird G. M. & M. Co., main Johnson shaft, 1750 ft., and now sinking to water-level, probably 100 ft. deeper.
  • Findley Con. G. M. Co., main shaft, 1387 ft.
  • Golden Cycle M. Co., main shaft, 1700 ft.
  • - Theresa mine shaft, 1200 ft.
  • Gold Sovereign M. & T. Co., main shaft, 1100 ft.
  • Isabella Mines Co., Lee shaft, 1275 ft.
  • - Empire State shaft, 1220 ft.
  • Last Dollar G. M. Co., main shaft, 1200 ft.
  • Stratton's Independence M. & D. Co., American Eagles shaft, 1500 ft.
  • - John A. Logan shaft, 1500 ft.
  • - and Orpha May shaft, 1500 ft.
  • Trilby Mines Co., main shaft, 1120 ft.
  • United Gold Mines Co., Wild Horse shaft, 1225 ft.
  • Vindicator Con. G. M. Co., main or No. 1 shaft, 1630 ft.
  • - Hull City shaft, 1265 ft.
  • - Lillie shaft, 1526 ft., has been abandoned.

Beacon Hill:
  • El Paso Con. G. M. Co., No. 1 shaft connected with the Roosevelt deep-drainage tunnel at 1332 ft. from surface.
  • Henry Adney G. M. Co., Maid of Orleans shaft, 900 ft.
  • Gold Dollar Con. Mines Co. has the deepest shaft on the opposite or eastern slope of Beacon hill in the Mable M. shaft, 994 ft. deep.

Carbonate Hill:
  • Elkhorn shaft, 450 feet.

Globe Hill:
   No shaft in this district has attained a depth of 1000 ft. The two deepest shafts are on
properties of the Stratton estate.
  • The Plymouth Rock, between 800 and 900 ft., is inactive and is reported in bad working condition.
  • The Deerhorn shaft, active and producing, is 650 feet.

Gold Hill, the shafts to attain a depth below 1000 ft. on this hill are the:
  • Anchoria-Leland, 1200 ft.
  • Moon Anchor, 1100
  • Half Moon and Conundrum are below 1000 ft.
  • The Mary McKinney drifts will cut under the summit at a depth of 1700 feet.

Galena Hill:
  • The deepest shaft on this hill is that on the Sunshine mine. The property is now active. A depth of 450 ft. was attained in the incline sunk on this property.

Guyot Hill:
  • The Katinka G. M. Co.'s shaft on the Chicken Hawk mine, now 1020 ft. deep, is being sunk by the Progressive Mining & Development Co. to a depth of 1250 feet.

Ironclad Hill:
  • Jerry Johnson M. Co., main shaft, 975 feet.

Mineral Hill:
  • Addie C. shaft, 485 ft. The property is inactive.

Poverty Gulch:
  • Gold King M. Co., main shaft, 1007 ft.
  • Abe Lincoln mine, of the Stratton estate, 925 ft., with drifts into Womack hill in excess of 1200 ft. from surface.

Raven Hill:
  • Cresson Con. G. M. & M. Co. 's main shaft is 1350 ft.
  • Elkton Con. M. & M. Co.'s main shaft, on the Walter claim, 1200 feet.

Squaw Mountain, the two deepest shafts are the:
  • Climax, 400 ft.
  • Nellie V., 325 feet.

Tenderfoot Hill:
  • Grafton G. M. Co., Hoosier shaft, 650 ft.
  • Mollie Kathleen shaft, 1000 feet.

Outside districts:
   No shafts have been sunk to a depth of 500 ft. on Copper or Rhyolite mountains, Signal hill, or in any of the outlying districts.

   The Deep Drainage Tunnel, with its portal at an altitude of 8033 ft., attained its greatest depth under the summit of Beacon hill at an approximate depth of 1500 feet.

Mining and Scientific Press

22.03.1919

Volume: 118

Issue: 12

Page: 405

[Personals]:

- Personal

   Clark G. Mitchell, managing director of the Isabella Mines Co. at Cripple Creek, has resigned.
   Frank Gunn continues as superintendent.

Mining and Scientific Press

01.11.1919

Volume: 119

Issue: 18

Page: 644

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   Stockholders of the Isabella Mines company are invited by a circular letter signed by C.M. Carson, vice-president of the company, to participate in the  organization of the Isabella Leasing company, formed for the purpose of further development of the Isabella estate on Bull hill.
   As set forth in the letter, development on company account has been impossible "because of the advance in price of mining material and labor,  occasioned by the "War."

   The lease, it is understood, will be granted the new company for a five-year term, with the privilege of a three-year extension, and royalties on ore marketed will be on a sliding scale.
   The ground included in the lease extends from the eleventh level of the Lee shaft to the bottom, or fifteenth, level, west from the west sideline of the Orphan No. 1 and includes the Orphan No. 2, Ida Bell No. 1 and 2, Emma No. 1, Comet and Jack Rabbit lodes No. 1 to 4 inclusive, Ex., J. Gold, Bully, and Tom Thumb lode claims.

   It is proposed, according to the circular, to start work on the 15th level of the Lee shaft, taking advantage of a cross-cut 1000 ft. long and to continue the cross-cut 300 ft. to cut the Sump and Buena Vista veins.
   The veins would then be cut at a depth of 450 ft. below the Buena Vista and Sump oreshoots that produced approximately three million dollars.
   It is further proposed to continue the cross-cut some 200 ft. farther to explore the junction of the Buena Vista and Maloney veins, the No. 2 vein, No. 3 vein, and finally the Emma vein.
   All of these veins have produced ore in the upper workings.

   Subscriptions to the leasing company stock will be limited to 6000 shares of the par value of $1 each.

Mining and Scientific Press

08.11.1919

Volume: 119

Issue: 19

Page: 682-683

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mine

   The old and well-known Isabella mine, during the active speculation that formerly prevailed in Cripple Creek stocks, was for years used as the basis for numerous stock-jobbing schemes.
   Owing to the relative inactivity of this mine for some time past, a movement has been started by stockholders to interest a sufficient number of such stockholders in the proposed Isabella Leasing Co., to be capitalized at $25,000 with shares at one dollar par.
   Capital derived from disposal of this stock will be devoted to development of new ground.
   Ore produced by the leasing company will be charged royalties ranging from 8% to 30%, depending upon grade of shipments.

Mining and Scientific Press

15.11.1919

Volume: 119

Issue: 20

Page: 718

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Leasing Company

   Active operations have been commenced by the Isabella Leasing company, recently incorporated to operate a lease on the property of the Isabella Mines Co., Bull Hill.
   Operations, which are in charge of David Mason, started from the 15th level of the Lee shaft at a depth of approximately 1275 ft., where a cross-cut is being driven south-west to cut under the Buena Vista ore-shoot that produced high-grade ore.
   The work planned will cut below this old stope 450 ft.
   October production made by four sets of lessees now operating on the Isabella estate approximated 500 tons of milling-grade ore.

Mining and Scientific Press

22.11.1919

Volume: 119

Issue: 21

Page: 754

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Leasing Company

   The Isabella Leasing company has the 15th level of the Lee or main shaft of the Isabella Mines company unwatered, and cross-cutting has started for the Buena Vista, Emma, Maloney, Orphan Belle, and other veins that have been ore producers in the past.

Mining and Scientific Press

27.12.1919

Volume: 119

Issue: 26

Page: 932

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   The new orebody opened up on the Buena Vista vein, on the Cheyenne claim, Isabella Mines Co., by the Wilson lease has developed into a strong shoot and two cars of the ore shipped assayed more than 2 oz. gold.

Mining and Scientific Press

14.02.1920

Volume: 120

Issue: 7

Page: 238

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella

   The northern extension of the rich Maloney vein has been cut at the fifth level of the Empire State shaft of the Isabella company on Bull hill, by Ed Lindsey, lessee.
   Two cars shipped to date netted between $30 and $40 per ton.

Mining and Scientific Press

03.04.1920

Volume: 120

Issue: 14

Page: 501

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   Directors of the Isabella Mines Co., at a special meeting held in Colorado Springs, have determined to change the base of operations from the Lee shaft to the Empire State shaft, situated at about the centre of the group.
   The Lee shaft-house and machinery were recently destroyed by fire of unknown origin, entailing a loss in excess of $100,000 with insurance of about $25,000.

   The Empire State shaft now 1100 ft. deep will be sunk 235 ft further, to correspond to the 15th level of the Lee, at a depth of 1275 ft.
   Two new cables 1600 ft. long have been ordered and will be wound at the Empire State shaft immediately upon delivery when sinking will be started.
   All lessees, ten in number, will be given extensions of their respective leasses.

   The Isabella Leasing Co., recently organized by stockholders of the parent company, had just cut the Larson vein, about midway between the Lee and the Empire State, and grab-samples are said to be above average.
   The change to the Empire shaft should prove beneficial, as the virgin ground to the west can now be exploited at comparatively small cost.
   The Maloney and No. 2 veins of the Isabella system will be thoroughly exploited by the Isabella Leasing Co., holding a five-year lease.

   The Lee will not be entirely abandoned and an electric hoist will be erected for use by the lessees who were mining a good grade of ore from the second level.

Mining and Scientific Press

15.05.1920

Volume: 120

Issue: 20

Page: 720

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   The Empire State shaft of the Isabella Mines Co., in the centre of the Bull Hill area, has been unwatered to the 1000-ft. level and sinking to the 1500-ft. point will start as soon as the contract is let.
   The Empire will become the main working shaft.

   The shafthouse, ore-house, and machinery at the Lee shaft were destroyed by fire early in the year.

Mining and Scientific Press

29.05.1920

Volume: 120

Issue: 22

Page: 806

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   An electric hoist has been placed at the 900-ft. level of the Empire State shaft, Isabella Mines Co., to be used when sinking of the shaft is started.
   Six sets of lessees on the property are producing and shipping a good grade of ore from the upper levels.

Mining and Scientific Press

05.06.1920

Volume: 120

Issue: 23

Page: 840

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   The Empire State shaft-sinking contract has not yet been let by Isabella Mines Co. management.
   The shaft is to be sunk from 1100 to 1500 ft. on this Bull Hill property.

Mining and Scientific Press

03.07.1920

Volume: 121

Issue: 1

Page: 23

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   The Isabella Mines Co., having failed to secure satisfactoiy bids for sinking the Empire State shaft, is doing the work on company-account.
   Lessees on the property continue production.

Mining and Scientific Press

24.07.1920

Volume: 121

Issue: 4

Page: 134

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   A vein of altered granite, not hitherto cut on the property, has been found in sinking the Empire State shaft of the Isabella Mines Co., below the 900-ft, level station.
   The vein has two streaks, two feet apart, that sample $30 to $50 per ton.
   It has a north-west strike and dips strongly to the north-west.
   The shaft is to be continued to the 1500-ft. point.

Mining and Scientific Press

07.08.1920

Volume: 121

Issue: 6

Page: 206

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   Lessees on the third level at the Lee shaft of the Isabella Mines Co. have installed an air-hoist and are hoisting ore from the vein recently opened.
   The ore is sampling one ounce in gold, and, as the vein or dike is fully 12 ft. wide, ore is made rapidly.
   One round of machine-drilled holes breaks more than the shovelers can handle on one shift.

Mining and Scientific Press

23.04.1921

Volume: 122

Issue: 17

Page: 576

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   The Isabella Mines Co., to encourage leasing, has reduced royalties 5%. Lessees may now work either on a scale graded from 10% on $10 ore to 30% above $75 per ton, or on a flat royalty of 25%.

Mining and Scientific Press

04.06.1921

Volume: 122

Issue: 23

Page: 790

[Review of Mining]:

Isabella Mines Company

   Good ore is reported from the Buena Vista vein of the Isabella Mines Co. at a depth of 1200 ft.
   The vein is about 3 ft. wide and the ore has been opened to date for about 75 ft.

Mining and Scientific Press

30.07.1921

Volume: 123

Issue: 5

Page: 167

[Review of Mining]:

Buena Vista

   The Buena Vista workings, Isabella Mines Co., are again active under lease. A shipment was made recently.


Last updated 01.04.2010 [16:36:15]